Tag Archives: Software Craftsmanship week

Software Craftsmanship week: A brief history

To conclude the software craftsmanship week, I would like to take a brief look on the history of this movement. So, we’ll take a look on the Software Craftsmanship book, on the creation of the Manifesto for Software Craftsmanship, on the writing of the Software Craftsman’s Ethic, The Wandering Book and some apprentice blogs, some conferences, and the software craftsman swap programs from Obtiva, 8thLight, and Relevance. WikiPedia also has a great history on it with some points I won’t mention here.

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Software Craftsmanship week: Deliberate Practice and Learning

Reflecting over the history of the Manifesto for Software Craftsmanship and the ideas we concluded for the The Software Craftsman’s Ethic, so far I just covered two aspects. The key ideas behind the manifesto and the ethic statements is that craftsman care for their work, taking pride in it, they practice their craft regularly, they learn deliberately, and finally they share their knowledge in communities and with peers. So far, we have started our journey this week with on the sharing part, and continued to take a closer look on the caring part in the last two days. Today, we will spent time on deliberate practice and learning parts.

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Software Craftsmanship week: Clean Tests

To some degree I envy programmers for their clear guidelines. One of these set of these guidelines is well-written in Robert Martin’s book Clean Code – A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship. (Personally, I hope that Kurt Häusler will review it this Software Craftsmanship week on his blog.) So, today I decided to write about Clean Tests, and what a book on the topic should cover.

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Software Craftsmanship week: Ethics Revisited

Continuing the software craftsmanship week, today I will take a closer look on the ethics of being a software craftsman. Nearly two years ago, Robert Martin held a keynote talk on Craftsmanship and Ethics. Let’s revisit some points he mentions from the tester perspective.

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Software Craftsmanship week: Apprenticeship in Software Testing

The Mis-education and Re-education of a software tester is a topic that I see discussed heavily. In the past I have reflected back about my personal education as a software tester, and what I had to contribute myself to this. After having read Pete McBreen’s Software Craftsmanship – The New Imperative I started to understand part of the problem. In chapter 2 McBreen explains most flaws of the Software Engineering metaphor. This is my first blog post in the Software Craftsmanship week 2010. I will spend some thoughts on related topics over the course of the whole week. Today, I would like to take a closer look on educational models for testers – in Software Engineering and what clever people have come up with for compensation.

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